CAVANAGH'S
Cottage


Location

You could spend weeks losing yourself in wild and woolly Donegal. The county’s stark beauty captivates you and, over time, seeps down to your core. Tortuous country roads skirt stark mountains, rugged sea cliffs, craggy peninsulas, sheep-studded pastures, pristine sands, icy streams and horizons carpeted with bog and heather. Reaching up to the island’s northernmost point, the county seems eternally braced to hold its own on its own.

Due to its isolation, Ireland’s second-largest county (only Cork is larger) feels like its own country. Donegal was always a stubbornly independent land, largely ignored by those in Dublin’s distant driving seat.

The Donegal experience is largely about weather, for here there’s no need to set sail to brave the sea – the sea charges ashore and its mists ride stiff winds over fields and into the towns. Storms arrive unannounced, and just as abruptly break into brilliant sunshine, transforming the blue and grey into sparkling greenery. When the weather is kind, Donegal’s better beaches and scenery are a match for any throughout Europe, and make perfect destinations for a getaway. Once you’ve attained the proper come-what-may attitude, you’ll know you’ve been tamed by this uncompromising land.

Cavanagh’s Cottage is located in Tremore Gleneely and sits on the Inishowen Peninsula in the northeast of County Donegal which is perhaps the great overlooked treasure of the Irish landscape, offering a diverse and visually exciting terrain, where the views usually encompass the waters of the loughs or the Atlantic waves. Virtually every aspect of the landscape is superb – the beaches (especially Kinnego Bay, Culdaff, Tullagh and Pollan), the towering headland bluffs (Malin, Inishowen, Gleneely,Dunaff and Dunree) and the central mountain range, with towering Slieve Snaght at the middle of it all.

The peninsula derives its name from Eoghan, who was made First Lord of the island by his father Niall, High King of Ireland. Phases of the peninsula’s history before and after Eoghan have left a legacy of fine antiquities, and visitors are most welcome at the many fort sites among the county which host the beautiful early Christian crosses.

Visit the Things to Do page to find out more about the area.